The 1% for the Planet network supports the Amazon Rainforest. Here’s how you can,too:

 
Photo credit: Rainforest Trust

Photo credit: Rainforest Trust

The 1% for the Planet network supports the Amazon Rainforest. Here’s how you can, too:

This is your reminder that, although it might not still be in the headlines or within your social media feed, the Amazon Rainforest is still on fire and on a path toward continued destruction.

When environmental disasters such as these fires strike, many people turn to us and ask “how can we help?” The answer is simple: act now.

We’ve outlined below the approved nonprofit organizations in our network that are working to not only combat the Amazon Rainforest fires, but work to protect the Amazon Rainforest, its indigenous people, biodiversity and vital ecosystems every day.

At 1% for the Planet, we pride ourselves on the ability to match individuals and businesses with high-impact nonprofit partners that align with their values, goals and concerns. We know that our members want to make the most impact possible, which is why we carefully vet all of our environmental nonprofit partners and why we have a reputation of being true experts in environmental philanthropy.

We hope this list of our nonprofit partners in the Amazon will inspire you to take action, or better yet, make the commitment to providing prolonged support of these organizations by joining 1% for the Planet.


1% for the Planet approved nonprofit organizations aiding the Amazon Rainforest:

Photo Credit: Pachamama Alliance

Photo Credit: Pachamama Alliance

Pachamama Alliance

📍Ecuador & Peru

Pachamama Alliance works with indigenous partners in Ecuador and Peru to stand for the rights of indigenous people and nature, safeguarding the Amazon Rainforest and works in the industrialized world to shift the culture of overconsumption and separation that threatens the Amazon.

Pachamama Alliance ‘s work supports indigenous people of the Amazon basin to fulfill their right to self-determination by preserving their lands, culture, and way of life.

INDIGENOUS RESILIENCE: With their indigenous partners and other organizations, Pachamama Alliance is currently working to secure permanent protected status of the Sacred Headwaters region—an area of more than 60 million acres—of the Amazon rainforest in Ecuador and Peru.

To learn more about how our culture of consumption is driving environmental disasters like the fires in the Brazilian Amazon and what you can do to help, take our Awakening the Dreamer online course. To learn more about what you can do to address climate change, take our Reversing Global Warming online course.

To support Pachamama Alliance’s work, Make a Donation.

Already a 1% for the Planet member? Learn how you can support the Pachamama Alliance’s work as a part of your 1% commitment by emailing melissa@pachamama.org.


Photo Credit: Rainforest Trust

Photo Credit: Rainforest Trust

Rainforest Trust

📍Peru

Rainforest Trust stops deforestation in rainforests across the tropics. To date, the organization has safeguarded over 23 million acres. They have a project presently in the Peruvian Amazon that will protect more than 220 indigenous communities that span 6 million acres by helping people gain official titles to their lands.

“For more than 30 years, Rainforest Trust has been identifying important habitat in dire need of protection. Through outright purchase, titling and designation, we establish protected areas that significantly reduce fires like these in the Amazon, the Congo, Indonesia and Bolivia. The world’s attention can be short, but ours never wavers.”—Mark Gruin, acting CEO


Photo Credit: Rainforest Foundation

Photo Credit: Rainforest Foundation

Rainforest Foundation US

📍The Amazon River Basin

Rainforest Foundation US has worked for 30 years supporting the rights of Indigenous Peoples to defend the tropical rainforests they call home in Central and South America. To date, Rainforest Foundation US has protected more than 33 million acres of rainforest.

Rainforest Foundation US ‘s primary strategy is to empower Indigenous Peoples in their ability to secure, monitor, and protect their territories. We do this in three ways:

  1. Ensure Indigenous Peoples have legal rights to control their lands. (About 20% of the Amazon forest is in the hands of Indigenous Peoples.)

  2. Provide support and counseling to Indigenous communities seeking better ways to manage and administer their forests

  3. Train Indigenous communities to monitor their lands through the use of advanced satellite, drone, GPS, and other technologies.

FUN FACT: Studies show that lands protected by Indigenous Peoples contain more biodiversity than protected areas with no human intervention.

In 2018 alone, Rainforest Foundation US protected 9 million acres of forests using its award-winning, community-based monitoring and protection program. This represents 14,000 square miles or 7 times the size of the Grand Canyon. In the coming years, Rainforest Foundation US intends to roll-out its community-driven technology solution across all 9 countries in the Amazon River Basin


Photo Credit: Rainforest Connection

Photo Credit: Rainforest Connection

Rainforest Connection

📍Amazon Rainforest

Rainforest Connection (RFCx) is a nonprofit tech start-up committed to applying the most effective and timely technology to protect our planet’s precious, ancient forests and wildlife. In short, Rainforest Connection creates acoustic monitoring systems to end illegal deforestation in real-time. These high-tech monitoring systems allow local partners in the Amazon to intervene with threats to these forests as soon as they are detected.

Rainforest Connection partners with local NGOs and indigenous tribes to deter incursions through real time threat detection and providing forensic evidence to enable governments to take action to prevent further incursions. Rainforest Connection plans to make this data available to academic researchers and government agencies to assist the fields of field ecology and conservation.

You can listen to the rainforest, too, with Rainforest Connection’s live streaming app.

“Every minute counts. Real-time awareness means real-time intervention.”


Photo Credit: Camino Verde

Photo Credit: Camino Verde

CAMINO VERDE

📍Peru

MISSION: To restore the forest landscapes of the Amazon by strengthening forest communities.

Camino Verde partners with Amazonian farmers and native communities to regenerate forest and improve livelihoods to meet the following objectives:

  • To protect, regenerate and understand the biodiversity of the Peruvian Amazon.

  • To support indigenous rights, autonomy, and wisdom.

  • To spread sustainable ways of life and catalyze fair, regenerative development.

“Our approach centers around linking restoration activities to the production of non-timber forest products that offer improved livelihood for Amazonian communities. In other words, we are farmers working with farmers to plant trees that provide valuable fruits while growing the rainforest back. 

Given the opportunity, rainforest people are the most effective and knowledgable conservationists and regenerators of forest.”


RAINFOREST PARTNERSHIP

📍Ecuador & Peru

Photo Credit: Rainforest Partnership

Photo Credit: Rainforest Partnership

Rainforest Partnership conserves and restores tropical rainforests by working with communities to develop sustainable livelihoods that empower and respect both people and nature.

Our world faces many environmental challenges that demand we create long-term solutions. Rampant deforestation, loss of biodiversity, climate change––each one presents their own inherent difficulties. However, there are ways to address these complex issues simultaneously.

Rainforest Partnership’s model is based on two of the strongest approaches to protecting rainforests, their biodiversity, and mitigating climate change.

Working directly with local and indigenous communities in the Amazon, Rainforest Partnership creates sustainable livelihoods and conservation areas that enable them to protect their rainforest.


Photo Credit: Rainforest Alliance (Mohsin Kazmi)

Photo Credit: Rainforest Alliance (Mohsin Kazmi)

Rainforest ALLIANCE

📍Rainforests around the world

The Rainforest Alliance addresses some of the world’s most pressing environmental issues by bringing together business, people, agriculture and forests. By creating alliances between a diverse group of supporters, the Rainforest Alliance aims to not only protect the world’s rainforests, but also secure a thriving future for our planet.

In response to the devastating fires in the Amazon Rainforest, Rainforest Alliance aims to put increasing pressure on the Brazilian government to defend the Amazon Rainforest against illegal logging, agricultural burning, and other environmental threats. Currently, Rainforest Alliance is pledging all funds from their Instagram to be 100% directed to their partner groups within the Brazilian Amazon.

Read more about The Rainforest Alliance’s Response to the Fires in the Amazon Rainforest and how you can help achieve their mission.


AMAZON WATCH

📍Amazon Rainforest

Amazon Watch works to protect the Amazon Rainforest by promoting the rights of the indigenous people of the Amazon. They do so with three goals in mind:

  • Stop Amazon Destruction: Amazon Watch resists the destruction of the Amazon by challenging disastrous development projects and natural resource extraction and by promoting indigenous rights.

  • Advance Indigenous Solutions: Amazon Watch supports and promotes indigenous—led alternative solutions to climate change, natural resource extraction, and industrial development.

  • Support Climate Justice: Amazon Watch joins with the climate justice movement to address the fact that the most vulnerable – especially indigenous people and people of color – bear the brunt of environmental destruction, corporate greed, and climate change and are often excluded from top-down solutions.

Learn more about how Amazon Watch achieves these goals and how you can support their work here.


Photo Credit: Murray Cooper (Rainforest Concern)

Photo Credit: Murray Cooper (Rainforest Concern)

RAINFOREST CONCERN

📍Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, Columbia

Rainforest Concern works to protect threatened natural habitats and the biodiversity they contain by working with the indigenous people who depend on these lands for survival. In the past 25 years, Rainforest Concern has protected over 2.2 million hectares of threatened forests around the globe.

“Our vision is to enable local communities to protect their natural environment, establish biodiversity corridors to create connectivity of habitat, and put in place long term conservation measures to safeguard vulnerable habitat for the future.”


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INICIATIVA VERDE

📍Brazil

Through their forest recovery projects, Iniciativa Verde works to mitigate climate change caused by human activity. To do so, Iniciativa Verde calculates carbon inventories caused by humans and businesses, offers a Carbon Free seal to those who offset their carbon emissions through Iniciativa Verde, promote forest restoration, clean water initiatives and support indigenous landowners. However, the majority of Iniciativa Verde’s projects involve reforesting Brazilian forests.

Iniciativa Verde believes that the environment can and must be preserved. That rural communities must be respected and that there can be peaceful coexistence between nature and the whole of society.”


COOL EARTH

📍Peru

Cool Earth’s mission is simple: to halt deforestation to mitigate climate change. In order to do so, they have an effective strategy: put local people back in charge of their land and forests.

“Local people stand to lose the most from deforestation but the most to gain from its protection. As such, they are the forest’s best possible custodians. That’s why all Cool Earth partnerships are community-owned and led – an approach that research is continually proving to be the most effective way to keep rainforest standing. By developing local livelihoods, our mission is to end the cycle of deforestation entrenching villages into further poverty. Creating strong, self-determining communities – not dependency.”


Photo Credit: Bruno Kelly/Reuters (Rainforest Action Network)

Photo Credit: Bruno Kelly/Reuters (Rainforest Action Network)

Rainforest Action Network

📍Amazon Rainforest

Rainforest Action Network preserves forests, protects the climate and upholds human rights. They do so through their partnerships and strategic campaigns that challenge corporate powers and systemic injustice.

Like us, they want the world to know all the ways they can help in combatting the fires and deforestation in the Amazon within their network.

“Considered the lungs of the planet, producing 20% of the oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere, the survival of the Amazon Rainforest is critical to the survival of us all. From the oxygen we breathe to the clean water we drink, we have long held a commitment to keep the destruction of this critically important rainforest at bay.”


ARBIO

📍Peru

Led by a committed group of women, ARBIO works to implement forest conservation in and effort to protect the Arbio Forest, 916 hectares of rainforest along the Las Piedras river, Madre de Dios. ARBIO promotes conservation efforts through biodiversity research, and finances land conservation.

ARBIO implements four sustainable development goals:

  • Gender Equality

  • Clean Water and Sanitation

  • Climate Action

  • Life on Land


Photo Credit: Amazon Conservation

Photo Credit: Amazon Conservation

Amazon Conservation

📍Peru & Bolivia

Amazon Conservation has worked to protect the western Amazon Rainforest for over 20 years. Their mission? To unite science, innovation and community to protect the western Amazon—the greatest wild forest on earth.

“Our founding program provided support for Brazil nut harvesters in Peru, as an incentive for protecting the forest. Since then, the organization has grown to protect over 4 million acres of rainforest, establish Peru’s first conservation concession, host thousands of scientists and tourists at our three premier biological stations, empower indigenous communities to develop forest-friendly livelihoods, and so much more.”

You can learn more about Amazon Conservation’s impact through their annual report.